The Hogan bridge
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

Bridge Transformation

While we believe that it is always better to be humble, sometimes you earn the right to ‘toot your horn’ as the saying goes.  This is a story that we are very proud about from a number of perspectives.

A very successful and reputable construction company out of Connecticut – O & G, Inc. – asked us to come and look at a bridge they wanted to replace on the Torrington Golf Club in Goshen, CT.  Torrington is a beautiful golf club with a rich history, including hosting several major regional and national competitions.

The bridge in question was 20’ X 12’ and was used for equipment weighing up to 14,000 lbs.  O & G was donating the bridge to Torrington as a memorial bridge in honor of 3 deceased brothers who were founding partners of O & G and had spent many enjoyable days at Torrington GC.

After supplying an initial quote, we went to examine the old bridge – wood planks on 3 steel beams.  Based on our analysis of the bridge, we determined that the steel beams were in great shape and that we could reduce the cost considerably by incorporating these into the new design.

old bridge

The original bridge

The particular challenge presented to us was that O & G wanted something very special as a memorial bridge.  Working with our Design Team, O & G decided on a ‘Hogan’ style bridge which has an arched deck and ‘rubble’ stone fascia on each side.  We had to design and engineer a solution that arched the deck, accommodated Vehicular Live Loads of 14,000 lbs. and had a fascia on each side.

The solution started with making structural deck panels with progressively deeper beams to create the arched deck.  We custom fabricated 5 – 4’ panels, each the full width of the bridge, and these were attached to the steel beams to make the ‘structural-arched deck’.

Deck panels being fitted over the steel beams.

From there, we attached the ‘stone’ fascia to the deck beams and capped it with a curb.  The curbs on each side of the bridge deck have inscriptions denoting the memorial tribute that was the inspiration for the bridge.

 The finish product look like this Hogan Bridge. (We are waiting for a picture of the installed bridge at O & G Inc.)The Hogan Bridge

To anyone looking at this bridge, it appears to have a concrete deck, granite curbs and ‘rubble’ stone with mortar as a structural arch on the sides.  In reality, all of the components added to the steel beams that were retained were made of 100% fiberglass.

We started this story by telling you that our team was particularly proud about this project.  Let us close by telling you why:

  • Our association with the O & G and Torrington GC Teams – a more professional group of people would be hard to find. Their thoroughness and attention to detail made them a pleasure to work with.

  • Our efforts to help our client save money by retaining and re-using steel beams that have another 25+ years of useful life left in them. We credit our Design Team with engineering a method to create an arched deck on flat steel.

  • The final product is really a ‘work of art’ that will serve the members of the Torrington GC for many generations to come and provide a lasting tribute to the 3 deceased brothers who are honored with inscriptions on the bridge.

 

residentials bridge
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

Bridge Stories

There is a story behind every bridge we have ever made. We like to share these bridge stories because we hope that you will find them interesting and will want to work with us to make your own ‘bridge story’.

There is no shortage of material for the Bridge Stories.  Every project involves some combination of people, places and challenges.  We have been fortunate to meet and deal with some outstanding people as we have taken on more and more bridge projects.

It has also given our team the opportunity to do business in many interesting places in North America.  This is its own learning experience and it has a value that is hard to measure.

On the technical side, our business is committed to innovation.  This means our engineers and technicians are always be dealing with new ‘first-time’ challenges.  That’s a good thing.  It pushes all of us to constantly learn and improve and it makes us all better for it.

These ‘bridge stories’ sometimes intentionally omit names of people and their organizations.  This is out of respect for the privacy interests of our valued customers.

bridge
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

Links Bridges & The Fighting Irish

This bridge story is about another milestone in the Links Bridges legacy.  We want our bridges to be widely available to all that would benefit from their unique properties – regardless of budgets and applications.  At the same time, we like seeing our bridges on TV and to achieve that we need to work with buyers – particularly golf courses – that attract TV coverage.

Our bridges really are world-class in looks and performance.  No other golf course bridge will look as good and retain those good looks for many decades without any kind of maintenance.  In addition, the ease of installation and choice of finishes really makes it an ideal bridge for any golf course setting.  (The writer apologizes for that shameless plug.)

The Warren Golf Course is on the campus of the world-famous University of Notre Dame.  It was recently announced that The Warren Golf Course has been selected as the host for the 2019 U.S. Senior Open Championship.  This is obviously a major, prestigious event that will attract major crowds and a world-wide TV audience.

The team at The Warren Golf Course determined that they needed a couple of bridges to provide some more crossings of the water ways on the course to accommodate the expected crowds.  They chose 2 ‘Timber’ model bridges in the ‘weathered wood’ finish we offer.  We are not habitual ‘name-droppers’ but we were told that this finish was selected Ben Crenshaw, who along with Bill Coore are the architects of The Warren GC.

Warrenbridge

2 Bridges sitting in our factory while waiting shipment to The Warren GC

Don’t be fooled by the appearance – these bridges are made of 100% fiberglass – structural beams and deck.  The curbs are made of re-cycled material that has the same long-lasting properties as fiberglass.

Installation of these bridges has been delayed while the course team deals with the impact of some flooding damage.  We will be back to update this bridge story with some new pictures once the bridges are installed.

 

Carlteon Place
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

In a hurry? What could go wrong?

This bridge story is a tribute to the determination of Links Bridges’ Installation team and as well to the precision of our Manufacturing team.  Without both of these, this story would read differently.

Links Bridges was contracted by a public housing organization to provide a replacement for a bridge that connected a parking lot to the 2nd floor entrance of a multi-unit housing building.

The key to success, aside from providing a great, long-lasting, low-maintenance bridge, was to minimize the down-time between bridge removal and bridge replacement.  The bridge was a key entrance and egress for the residents who would suffer major inconvenience if they lost use of the bridge for more than a day.

It was determined, based on historical engineering data, that the existing foundations could be re-used.  Links Bridges was supplying a fiberglass bridge which was considerably lighter than the existing steel bridge/concrete deck previously installed.  It was also important to fit the bridge perfectly into an existing building alcove so that building structures were not impacted and the interior floor/deck interface were on the exact same level.

rotten wood

Existing Steel Bridge – 40’ long

The bridge was made and completely assembled so that it could be installed in 1 piece to minimize down time between bridges.  The installation date was set and equipment and personnel scheduled to come in to remove and demolish the existing bridge.  The plan was for ‘same-day’ removal and installation.

As it turned out, events affected plans.  The scheduled day turned out to the coldest day of the winter and a heavy snowfall made things even more difficult.  Our hardy crew would not be deterred and work proceeded.

The real problem happened when the old bridge was lifted out, we discovered damage to one of the concrete footings.  The damage was such that the bearing points for the new bridge were compromised.

Carlteon Place

We quickly got the Engineering Team involved and they designed a solution that involved anchoring steel angles into the (uncompromised) sides of the foundations to provide a new bearing surface for the bridge beams.  Our daylight hours were quickly disappearing and lifting a 40’ bridge into a tight space in dark, snowing, sub-zero conditions is never a good plan.  Besides, we still needed to locate a steel fabricator who would be willing to stop what they were doing and cut some angle steel to the sizes that were required.

With a bit of luck, charm and determination, we managed to get the steel that same night.  Throughout the next morning and afternoon our hardy crew suffered through extreme conditions to get these installed to provide a bearing platform for our bridge beams.  With daylight quickly fading, our crane started to lift the bridge into place.

Thanks to the precision work of our manufacturing team, the bridge was a perfect fit for the tight space.  Within an hour the bridge was anchored and ready for use.  This important access for the building residents was restored.

This picture was taken the morning after installation.  Snow and sub-zero temperatures made things a little more difficult.

GIS2017
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

“Inside The Ropes” at Golf Industry Show (GIS2017)

Links Bridges is pleased to announce a partnership with the 2017 Golf Industry Show – (GIS2017).

This year’s GIS is in Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida from February 4 to 9.

A new feature at the 2017 GIS is ‘Inside the Ropes’.  The Golf Course Builders Association of America (GCBAA) and other sponsors are teaming with GIS to create a 9,000 square foot area featuring Golf Course amenities.  Links Bridges is one of the key sponsors.

‘Inside the Ropes’ is a must-see at the 2017 GIS.  Links Bridges will provide an actual golf course bridge ‘Inside the Ropes’.  The bridge will be Links Bridges’ ‘Woody’ model – our most popular golf course bridge.  The ‘Woody” is made of 100% fiberglass and has a very authentic wood finish.

 

This is a unique opportunity for Golf Course Operators to check out the look and feel of a Fiberglass Golf Course bridge.   Wood bridges rot, steel bridges rust – both require maintenance.  Fiberglass bridges outlast all other bridges.  They  require no maintenance and retain their natural looks for decades.

Be sure to visit ‘Inside the Ropes’ and come see Links Bridges at Booth # 1612 at the 2017 GIS in Orlando.

The Wood bridge at GIS2017 is 15 feet by 6 feet with ramp in both sides. Would you like to take it home with you?

 

 

100% Fiber Glass Bridge
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

Links Bridges reaches milestone in Carleton Place!

Links Bridges achieved another milestone this week with the installation of a bridge serving a residential complex.  The bridge connects a parking lot to a building entrance on the 2nd floor of the building at Carleton Place, Ontario residential complex.

The project involved removal of an existing steel bridge which after 25 years of service had severe rust.  The replacement bridge, from Links Bridges Composite Series, was made with FRP (Fiber Reinforced Plastics) beams and decks.  The guard rail was made entirely of HDPE (High Density Poly-ethelene).

This bridge will last for decades.  There are no materials that will rot, rust or require any kind of painting or coatings to maintain the look of the bridge.  The management of the building initially became aware of the Links Bridges alternative from 2 bridges that Links Bridges supplied earlier in 2016 to the nearby community of Smiths Falls, Ontario.

The project was not without its challenges.  To prepare the bridge, the existing bridge details were carefully measured incorporated into the bridge design details.  There was no margin for error.  At each end the bridge had to match existing elevations including at the building entrance where the bridge deck needed to be exactly flush with the door jamb.  There were existing fences, retaining walls and abutments that had to be accommodated if this bridge was going to fit.

The initial plan had been to remove the old bridge and put in the new bridge all in the same day.  Unfortunately, when the old bridge was removed, it was discovered that the existing abutments – which were to be re-used for the new bridge – had suffered some erosion that wasn’t visible until the bridge was removed.

An immediate solution was required because there were residents of the building with access challenges who were reliant on this bridge to come and go.  The Links Bridges’ engineer assessed that the base of the abutments was sound but the integrity of the top surface of the abutments were compromised.

The engineer decided against a ‘concrete’ solution primarily because the temperature was well below freezing levels and not a good situation for concrete to properly cure.  The engineer designed a solution that involved anchoring steel angles to the (uncompromised) side of the abutment.

The Links Bridges team had the required steel fabricated and coated over night.  The next day the team worked in extreme cold conditions to get the abutments ready to receive the bridge.  By mid-afternoon, the bridge was lifted into place.   Everything fit perfectly and by late afternoon, the bridge was fully operational.