The Hogan bridge
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

Bridge Transformation

While we believe that it is always better to be humble, sometimes you earn the right to ‘toot your horn’ as the saying goes.  This is a story that we are very proud about from a number of perspectives.

A very successful and reputable construction company out of Connecticut – O & G, Inc. – asked us to come and look at a bridge they wanted to replace on the Torrington Golf Club in Goshen, CT.  Torrington is a beautiful golf club with a rich history, including hosting several major regional and national competitions.

The bridge in question was 20’ X 12’ and was used for equipment weighing up to 14,000 lbs.  O & G was donating the bridge to Torrington as a memorial bridge in honor of 3 deceased brothers who were founding partners of O & G and had spent many enjoyable days at Torrington GC.

After supplying an initial quote, we went to examine the old bridge – wood planks on 3 steel beams.  Based on our analysis of the bridge, we determined that the steel beams were in great shape and that we could reduce the cost considerably by incorporating these into the new design.

old bridge

The original bridge

The particular challenge presented to us was that O & G wanted something very special as a memorial bridge.  Working with our Design Team, O & G decided on a ‘Hogan’ style bridge which has an arched deck and ‘rubble’ stone fascia on each side.  We had to design and engineer a solution that arched the deck, accommodated Vehicular Live Loads of 14,000 lbs. and had a fascia on each side.

The solution started with making structural deck panels with progressively deeper beams to create the arched deck.  We custom fabricated 5 – 4’ panels, each the full width of the bridge, and these were attached to the steel beams to make the ‘structural-arched deck’.

Deck panels being fitted over the steel beams.

From there, we attached the ‘stone’ fascia to the deck beams and capped it with a curb.  The curbs on each side of the bridge deck have inscriptions denoting the memorial tribute that was the inspiration for the bridge.

 The finish product look like this Hogan Bridge. (We are waiting for a picture of the installed bridge at O & G Inc.)The Hogan Bridge

To anyone looking at this bridge, it appears to have a concrete deck, granite curbs and ‘rubble’ stone with mortar as a structural arch on the sides.  In reality, all of the components added to the steel beams that were retained were made of 100% fiberglass.

We started this story by telling you that our team was particularly proud about this project.  Let us close by telling you why:

  • Our association with the O & G and Torrington GC Teams – a more professional group of people would be hard to find. Their thoroughness and attention to detail made them a pleasure to work with.

  • Our efforts to help our client save money by retaining and re-using steel beams that have another 25+ years of useful life left in them. We credit our Design Team with engineering a method to create an arched deck on flat steel.

  • The final product is really a ‘work of art’ that will serve the members of the Torrington GC for many generations to come and provide a lasting tribute to the 3 deceased brothers who are honored with inscriptions on the bridge.

 

branding
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

‘Branding’

This bridge story is an illustration of how you can use the bridge as one more tool to promote your brand.  It’s not a long story but there is an important message that might be useful for some.

Links Bridges was contracted by The Marshes Golf Club to provide a replacement for a wood bridge that had suffered the fate that eventually befalls all wood bridges – rotten deck and rotten beams.

The Marshes is a prestigious public course in Canada’s capital city – Ottawa.  The Marshes sits in the midst of high rise buildings with millions of square feet of high end office space.  A luxury hotel – The Brookstreet is part of the property.

The Marshes, office buildings – which house numerous world leading technology companies – and golf course are under common ownership.  The golf course was designed by world-renowned architect Robert Trent Jones Sr.

The bridge was a simple enough project – 50’ long X 6’ wide in a wood finish.  They chose the flat ‘Timber’ model because the bridge is set in a bit of gulley and spans one of the many wetlands that gives The Marshes its name.

One of the features that Links Bridges uniquely offers is for logos to be incorporated on to the decks of bridges.  These are actually done with a laser process that results in a ‘negatively’ embossed logo on the deck.  The significance of this is that it means the logo lasts forever – like the bridge.  It won’t fade and weaken over time.  Faded logos do a great disservice to a brand as they convey the wrong message.

The Marshes took advantage of the opportunity presented by the new bridge to place not only The Marshes logo on one end but also the logo for The Brookstreet Hotel.  This is a clever means of ‘linking’ the brands and reminding golfers that the hotel and its many amenities are integral to the golf property.

brandingMarshees

Two ends of the same bridge showing different logos – the distinctive The Marshes Logo with its red-wing blackbird and The Brookstreet Hotel with its stylized ‘B’.

The main point of this bridge story is that good organizations recognize the value and importance of promoting their ‘brand’.  Links Bridges can help by incorporating your logo on the deck of your new bridge(s)

Carlteon Place
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

In a hurry? What could go wrong?

This bridge story is a tribute to the determination of Links Bridges’ Installation team and as well to the precision of our Manufacturing team.  Without both of these, this story would read differently.

Links Bridges was contracted by a public housing organization to provide a replacement for a bridge that connected a parking lot to the 2nd floor entrance of a multi-unit housing building.

The key to success, aside from providing a great, long-lasting, low-maintenance bridge, was to minimize the down-time between bridge removal and bridge replacement.  The bridge was a key entrance and egress for the residents who would suffer major inconvenience if they lost use of the bridge for more than a day.

It was determined, based on historical engineering data, that the existing foundations could be re-used.  Links Bridges was supplying a fiberglass bridge which was considerably lighter than the existing steel bridge/concrete deck previously installed.  It was also important to fit the bridge perfectly into an existing building alcove so that building structures were not impacted and the interior floor/deck interface were on the exact same level.

rotten wood

Existing Steel Bridge – 40’ long

The bridge was made and completely assembled so that it could be installed in 1 piece to minimize down time between bridges.  The installation date was set and equipment and personnel scheduled to come in to remove and demolish the existing bridge.  The plan was for ‘same-day’ removal and installation.

As it turned out, events affected plans.  The scheduled day turned out to the coldest day of the winter and a heavy snowfall made things even more difficult.  Our hardy crew would not be deterred and work proceeded.

The real problem happened when the old bridge was lifted out, we discovered damage to one of the concrete footings.  The damage was such that the bearing points for the new bridge were compromised.

Carlteon Place

We quickly got the Engineering Team involved and they designed a solution that involved anchoring steel angles into the (uncompromised) sides of the foundations to provide a new bearing surface for the bridge beams.  Our daylight hours were quickly disappearing and lifting a 40’ bridge into a tight space in dark, snowing, sub-zero conditions is never a good plan.  Besides, we still needed to locate a steel fabricator who would be willing to stop what they were doing and cut some angle steel to the sizes that were required.

With a bit of luck, charm and determination, we managed to get the steel that same night.  Throughout the next morning and afternoon our hardy crew suffered through extreme conditions to get these installed to provide a bearing platform for our bridge beams.  With daylight quickly fading, our crane started to lift the bridge into place.

Thanks to the precision work of our manufacturing team, the bridge was a perfect fit for the tight space.  Within an hour the bridge was anchored and ready for use.  This important access for the building residents was restored.

This picture was taken the morning after installation.  Snow and sub-zero temperatures made things a little more difficult.

Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

Ottawa Bridge Focus: Plaza Bridge

The city of Ottawa has gone through many changes over the years as buildings, streets, and bridges have been constructed, demolished, and rebuilt. The current shape and layout of the city is very different from what it was even a hundred years ago.  The Plaza Bridge, a pedestrian and automotive bridge which crosses the Rideau Canal just south of the Ottawa locks, is one such landmark that has changed drastically over time.

In the place where the Plaza Bridge now stands there originally stood two bridges — the Sappers Bridge and the Dufferin Bridge. The Sappers Bridge was built in 1827, one of Ottawa’s first bridges, and was named so because it was constructed by the 15th Company of the Royal Sappers and Miners. It was joined by the Dufferin Bridge in the early 1870s, forming a triangle across the Rideau Canal.

At the start of the 20th century, a hole was created in Sappers Bridge in order to allow rail traffic to pass through and head onto a new station that was being built just east of the Rideau Canal. The entire area underwent extensive renovation during the early 1900s, which saw the construction of the Union Station as well as the Chateau Laurier hotel. As a result, rail traffic was re-routed under the bridge along the canal’s eastern side and onto the Royal Alexandra Interprovincial Bridge and towards Gatineau.

In 1912, both the Dufferin Bridge and the Sappers Bridge were demolished. The newly-created bridge was named Plaza Bridge because, in bringing together Wellington Street and Elgin Street on its west side to merge with Rideau Street on the east side, it created an interesting ‘Y’ shape, designed to be used as an open public space. The resulting triangular plaza was named Connaught Park, after Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, who held the post of Governor General of Canada from 1911 to 1916. Today, the location is known as Confederation Square and is the site of the National War Memorial and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

The Plaza Bridge is constructed of three masonry spans: the western span goes over a roadway along the western bank of the Canal; the central span lies over the Canal; and the eastern span runs over the former railway tunnel along the east bank of the Canal. The Plaza Bridge lies just north of the Mackenzie King Bridge, making it the northernmost bridge over the canal and giving anyone crossing it a stunning view of the Parliament buildings, the Ottawa Canal, and the Chateau Laurier.

 

The newly-built Plaza Bridge in 1921. Source: The Contract Record, Vol. 26, No. 17, April 24, 1912.

The newly-built Plaza Bridge in 1921. Source: The Contract Record, Vol. 26, No. 17, April 24, 1912.

Links Bridges
Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

Restore Your Bridge Back to Life

We live in a disposable era, where the moment things break we either leave them that way (and promise we will fix them next weekend) or we replace them entirely, scrapping otherwise functional materials in exchange for a quick fix. Our mission at Links Bridges is to save our customers their time, their money, and their sanity. We have created a line of sustainable, eco-friendly bridges for municipalities, golf courses, and residences that don’t need to be fixed or replaced every few years. Additionally, we strive to replace the wastefulness in the landscaping industry by encouraging and providing services to accommodate bridge restoration and renewal.

With Links Bridges bridge restoration, our clients get to experience both an aesthetic and functional ‘new’ bridge at a fraction of the cost. Here is how:

First, consider that any bridge has 3 main components:

  1. Foundations/Abutments
  2. Beams
  3. Deck/Rails

It is often the case that the foundations and beams are still in great shape long after the deck has deteriorated.  This is particularly true for steel beam/wood deck bridges.

Our team of expert bridge designers and installers have perfected the art of bridge restoration, whereby, rather than replace the entire bridge when the deck needs replacement, Links Bridges can custom fabricate a new FRP deck.  Done properly, it can provide all of the benefits – including the look – of an entirely ‘new’ bridge. The best part is that this can all happen at a fraction of the cost of a new bridge.

The Links Bridges crew recently worked with the Sirocco Golf Club in Alberta on a successful restoration project.  The pictures below show the result.

Before:

links1

 

After:

links2

 

If your municipality, residence, or golf course has an older bridge that could use some tender love and care, contact our bridge experts at Links Bridges today for a free consultation on how to restore and revitalize your bridge. Whether your bridge runs through a golf course, a park, a trail, your backyard or otherwise, we can help bring it back to life. Contact us at info@linksbridges.com or call us at 888-444-0277.

Written by The Bridge Lady (Regina)

Bridging Communities: How Municipal Bridges Can Transform Communities

Just one year ago this week, Smiths Falls city councillors came together to approve a pre-fab carbon fibre bridge that would replace all three of Smiths Falls bridges. In 2012, a flood swept away bridge abutments and gravely impacted the foundation of all three bridges, preventing the community, tourists and boaters from truly enjoying the pristine and picturesque community of Smiths Falls and its waterfront.

 

One year later, Links Bridges is honoured to have drafted, designed and installed three exceptional municipal bridges that have established a pedestrian route around Smiths Falls parkland. As predicted by Art Manhire, the Director of Community Services, the bridges not only heightened the number of residents and travellers enjoying the waterfront, but also increased the geese population along the waters edges. The first bridge connects Turtle Island with the shoreline and seconds as a damn for the water system.

 

As with all Links Bridges designs, the Smiths Falls carbon fibre bridge has a lifespan of 50 years plus, are completely resistant to graffiti and was quick and easy to install. The municipality paid an affordable rain for the bridge restoration project and is reaping the benefits of having a complete connected community.

 

The Smiths Falls bridge replacement was a successful restoration project that makes our team proud to be in the bridge business. To learn more about Links Bridges municipal bridge options – from parks to trails to community centres and more – contact our team today at info@linksbridges.com or call us at 888-444-0277.